Class C Electric Trucks are green transportation

Electric Truck are an important form of green transportation: Trying to get commercial truck drivers to accept an electric vehicle over the internal combustion engine that they’ve known for years is a challenge . However, not an impossible one. What it’s going to take is getting more concept vehicles out there. Perhaps, giving more people the opportunity to ride in these vehicles. A pilot program, funded by a record $44.5 million matching grant from the California Air Resources Board, will study how well electric trucks integrate into regional operations operations.

Great Performance

People will start to understand that like the passenger electric cars really, really great performance. We find the same thing with the Class 8 truck. The acceleration in these vehicles is phenomenal. When you have this peak torque at 0 speed, you no longer have to worry about clutches closing. Getting this product in the hands of customers is what’s going to make the real shift. Also, having places like California trying to clean up their routes in and out of their ports. Trying to get those areas cleaned up that have so much pollution today. Working together with those cities and states, to try to get those vehicles out there. https://glewengineering.com/engineering-advances-degradation-and-saving-electric-vehicle-batteries/

Electric Trucks : High Energy Batteries

Battery electric trucks were not a viable option to replace heavy duty trucks in the past because the high energy requirement is always an issue. The Low energy density batteries could not power a truck. However, recent developments in battery technology are making electric heavy duty trucks technically viable and may enable cargo as another form of green transportation. Commercially viable as mild and full hybrid and battery electric. As battery prices are expected to decrease significantly. Life cycle costs of heavy duty electric trucks are expected to become lower than those of heavy duty diesel trucks. Making electrification of heavy duty trucks an interesting research area.

To perform a life cycle analysis with different Class 8 (approx. 36t) trucks in the United States and conclude that electric batteries out perform other alternative fuels. In terms of costs and emissions, despite their incremental costs and electricity generation related emissions. Also, calculate life cycle costs of 40 semi-trailer trucks in Germany and show that battery electric trucks perform at the same cost level as diesel trucks. Even when batteries dimensioned up to 825 kW hl. Recharging stations up to 880 kW charging power in order to enable 4.5 h trip durations. Full recharge during 45 min mandatory rest periods of drivers. Several, both traditional and new, truck manufacturers have introduced battery electric trucks recently. https://glewengineering.com/material-engineers-looking-to-future-solar-assisted-electric-vehicles-saevs/

Early Generations – Electric Trucks

Early generations of medium- and heavy-duty electric vehicles already beginning to enter the commercial trucking industry. Market availability and series production just a few years away. In June, battery-­electric versionof a heavy-duty Freightliner Cascadia and medium-­duty M2 models set for testing will launch as green transportation. To help pave the way for those product launches, DTNA has partnered with two of its fleet customers, 30 of those vehicles in the field for testing in real-world operations.

Other Manufacturers are ready to receive new additions to Electric Class 8 trucks . Plans to put those vehicles in the hands of its lease customers, who will use them to deliver actual freight in local and regional applications . This is a nonstop learning from the minute the trucks start running. There is an expectation from customers that manufacturers are ahead of the game at all times.

While it’s hard to tell how quickly electric trucks will become successful. The emergence of these vehicles is probably one of the biggest changes in trucking in decades. https://glewengineering.com/licensed-mechanical-engineer-reviews-a-modified-electric-vehicle-part-1/